Should I be worried about my dog’s poop?

Should I be worried about my dog’s poop?

We’ve all done it. Popped out in the garden under cover of darkness, torch in hand, (phone in my case) after they have done their business, just to… check. 

Should I be worried about my dog’s poop?

We’ve all done it. Popped out in the garden under cover of darkness, torch in hand, (phone in my case) after they have done their business, just to… check. 

And, it's reasonable behaviour. Really it is. There's no reason to be embarrassed. 

Our furry besties are often the centre of our universe. So it’s natural to make sure things are working just as they should. But when do you know if it’s time to pay a visit to the vet? 

If you feed your dog on a raw diet, here's what to look out for. 

White dog poop 

If your canine companion eats raw with too much bone or heavy calcium deposits, then their stools can appear to be chalky and white. It's often not a serious issue, but if your dog continues to consume too much calcium, he can become quite constipated. Chronic constipation in dogs If you think your dog is constipated because of too much bone in their raw diet, their next meal should contain a higher liquid content. Also, dog’s should always have access to clean, fresh water, so make sure you refill their water bowls twice a day. 

Tar-like poop 

This is not pleasant. And, it stinks. If your pooch passes a dark blackish-brown tar-like poop, it means their raw diet is probably unbalanced, and they are consuming too much organ meat. Secreting organ meat should only make up 10% of your dog’s natural diet (5% of which must be liver). 

If you’re also feeding liver as training treats, it might be wise to swap to something that your dog will find equally as delicious for a while. 

Mucus poop

Probably the grossest of all poops. Mucus can appear as a jelly-like substance; it can be white, be spotted with blood, or even encase the whole stool in a protective envelope-like casing. 

Mucus poop is not normal, and it can be a sign of a host of health problems for your dog. Some of the more common causes of mucus in your dog’s stools include: 
Stress, anxiety, depression 
Food intolerance 
Inflammatory bowel disease
Colitis 
Fungal infection 
Swallowing something they shouldn't

Dietary changes can also cause mucus poop, so you could expect it to a degree if you are swapping from a kibble-fed to a raw dog food diet. However, if it goes on for more than a few days, it’s time to pay a visit to the vet. 

Diarrhoea and loose stools 

Like with humans, there is quite a difference between diarrhoea and loose stools. If your dog has diarrhoea, you’ll notice other symptoms such as lethargy and disinterest in food. 

Diarrhoea can also be explosive, and your dog may not have control over his bowel movements. If this is the case, seek advice from your vet. 

Loose stools, on the other hand, are just that. There are many causes, including overeating fatty foods, gobbling up something they shouldn’t, and even stress or anxiety. There’s usually nothing to worry about unless it's been happening for more than a couple of days.  

The best part 

One thing you should notice if your pooch is fed raw is that their poop is not only smaller and less smelly, but it also decomposes pretty quickly. Major bonus! Of course, this doesn't mean you should leave it; there are still laws about that sort of thing. But it does mean that poop patrol is a less hazardous experience and allows more time for a game of fetch in the park. 

When switching from a kibble-fed to a raw dog food diet, there are bound to be some weird happenings with your dog’s poop while their digestive system adjusts. Monitoring things for a few days is essential. And, if symptoms persist for any longer than 24-48 hours, then call your vet for advice. It’s always better to check it out if you’re not sure, than not get to the vet on time.

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